What us anglers really chase, is endless opportunity in the unknown. What lurks underneath that lure, fly, or bait with every cast is the unknown we chase. When things become routine sometimes all that is missing is a new discovery.

We see it in ourselves, we see it in our friends and fellow anglers. Die-hard for one species; no if, and’s, or buts, there is one species worth fishing for and that’s it.

I definitely fell into that category when I started fishing as most of us do. A favorite fish emerges, and with blinders on, we dive into that species. For me, it was muskies, for my good friend Nicole Stone it was walleye– for you it may be the aggressive hit of a bass, challenge of a finicky trout, or even the physical stamina for a sturgeon.

Die-hard fishing for one species is immersive, interesting, and an absolute blast to focus your fishing on what captivates you. By all means, stay attuned with what you are passionate about, and above all else, fish for what makes YOU happy.

However, if you feel a slight burn-out when you hit the water, want to grow as an angler, or maybe you are just curious about branching out, giving new bites a shot is well worth the exploration. From my experience, it changes everything.

It goes without saying that I will be muskie obsessed until the day I die. My initial love for fishing came from the challenge and fight of a big, mean, and toothy fish. I am sure many relate to the obsession that comes hand in hand with muskellunge.

However… like many die-hard for one species anglers, I refused to admit that something had changed every time I hit the water. The drive and the spark that fueled the passion somehow felt diffused.

I asked myself what was wrong with me, on the days when my head just wasn’t in it. When in reality, nothing was wrong. I had just hit a slump and it was time for something new.

What us anglers really chase, is endless opportunity in the unknown. What lurks underneath that lure, fly, or bait with every cast is the unknown we chase. When things become routine sometimes all that is missing is a new discovery.

By pulling yourself away from the routine, you create space for new excitement. The favorite lake which always produces consistent fishing or the fish that haunts you which you can’t seem to catch, will all still be there when you return.

The attitude and growth that comes from trying new bites are what makes a difference. Exploration not only combats angler burn-out but too leads down a road where growing as an angler is possible.

Quickly after pulling myself away from muskies, I learned that I had just as much passion to chase brightly-colored trout in the mountains, to pitch a jig to angry largemouth on beds, or pull out the ultralight pole to catch bluegill in a tiny pond in the summer. I realized what sets the spark in fishing is the freedom to chase and pursue a changing target.

If anything I did not fall out of love for muskies, but instead renewed and eager to get back to fishing for them after being away for too long. As they say, it is possible to have too much of a good thing, and what does it hurt to step away and explore?

Keep the art of angling captivating for you, chase what you love, and do not hesitate to step into uncharted territory.

Tightlines!


About The Author

Die-hard muskie & trout angler with a passion. Kayak fishing, Hybrid chasing, Sunrise ↠ Sunset, http://nebraskamuskiegirl.com

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